Don’t buy Elephants Ivory – try Mammoth Ivory Instead

Richard Leakey is trying to answer the hard question of why lately the poaching for ivory increasing?

Elephant poaching in Africa has been increasing at an alarming rate. Kenya, whose elephant population has – according to the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) – increased from 16,000 elephants before the 1989 CITES ban on ivory trade to the current 32,000 – has seen its fair share of this poaching. It is now becoming a big problem and we are likely to see a sharp decline in the population of the African elephant if poaching remains unchecked. But how did this sudden increase occur and how can we solve it?

Elephant

First, this problem is not a problem of Kenya alone. It is happening all over Africa. Whereas the KWS blames the CITES-sanctioned one-off auction of ivory from southern African states to China and Japan for the sudden upsurge of poaching, there are indeed other factors that come into play. The upsurge in poaching is not a direct consequence of the auction although it did trigger the growth in demand.

What happened is that the auction made legal ivory available in the market and that was the danger. The sudden availability of a significant amount of ivory revitalized a market that had disappeared. Now, there is no way that legal ivory could satisfy demand in this enlarged market. Illegal ivory, consequently, found a new outlet and soon started fetching better prices at the source.

Although the influx on Chinese workers in Africa is also blamed for rising poaching, this is unlikely to be contributing significantly to the problem. The Chinese workers are lowly paid and thus they don’t have the large amounts of money required to buy ivory from poachers.

Far more important, there is quite a busy ivory market in China triggered by the one-off auction of Ivory last year. Twenty years ago ivory was not very affordable in China. Only a few rich people could buy. Today, China’s per capita income has been growing by about 8% per year. There are now tens of millions of Chinese people who can buy ivory. This is where the problem is.

In 1980s majority of these new buyers were young and did not know about the ivory crisis. The one-off sale however alerted this new market to the availability of ivory.

Poverty has also increased in Africa as the population grows faster than the economy. People are increasingly becoming desperate and are therefore getting more involved in poaching to put food on the table. The current drought in Kenya has made the situation even worse.

We also know that majority of African elephant range states have no effective policing mechanisms to contain this problem. in Kenya, the KWS has no money to fund any effective law enforcement that is required to contain poaching and the illegal ivory trade.

A solution needs to be found and the way forward is to try and get the total ban on ivory trade reinstated. Once the ban is reinstated, ivory disappears from the market. Possession of ivory becomes a crime. Policing thus gains some effectiveness. Furthermore, lack of a market will drive the price of raw ivory in Africa down.

People have asked me if KWS should repeat the public burning of ivory to make a statement, especially now that it is the 20-year anniversary of this event. I say it depends on how this is handled. Of course, we did raise some money back then, but the idea was new then. It is now an old idea and old ideas have to be handled carefully. It would however be a PR disaster for the KWS to sell the ivory to a third party.

In the old days, we created a fine force that was able to bring down the level of poaching until Kenya’s elephant population started increasing.  The situation is different today. Twenty years ago, elephant poaching was done by Somalis who were not very well equipped. Today, the poachers are mostly local people especially in the north of the country.

In the north, there are very many guns used primarily in cattle rustling – by both the rustlers and those protecting their cattle. These guns are now being used in poaching. This is worsened by KWS allowing the nomadic pastoralists into wildlife reserves especially during this drought. This is a big mistake. KWS should clear the reserves in order to get these guns away from elephants.

Until something is done, poaching will continue to escalate. The time to act is now.


We at www.IvoryCarvings.org looking at the poaching for ivory & THE WAR AGAINST  THE IVORY POACHING as a problem.

Of course that we are against elephant poaching for ivory but still we do like ivory carving.

With the ban of ivory the prices are going up,  frauds are being very common & it’s become very difficult to sell or to buy Ivory worldWide.

So what can we do?

As a matter of fact, as a moral people we can’t approve or accept the poaching of the elephant in order to get Ivory.

We do love Ivory but we love our world & especially Elephants we don’t  want to encourage any illegal Ivory trading nor poaching elephant for Ivory.

The best solution for mean time is to buy Mammoth ivory Carving!!! Mammoth ivory is Legal worldwide & no animal is being poaching. The woolly mammoth is extinct from this world before 10,000 years ago & It’s really an amazing Ivory to carved on.

It’s very similar to the elephant ivory tusk but the tusks are nuch bigger that the elephant’s tusks  & it’s can reach more than 5-6 Meter length.

Look at this site for legal interesting Mammoth ivory carvings: www.IvoryAndArt.com

Look at this  picture of Mammoth ivory carving artifacts: Figurines, Netsuke & tusk sall made out of Mammoth Ivory tusk:


Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • TwitThis
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Pownce
  • MySpace

Still people try to sell illegal Elephant ivory

Kenya seizes $1 million Asia-bound rhino, elephant ivory

NAIROBI, July 15 (Reuters) – Kenyan wildlife authorities have impounded
nearly $1 million worth of elephant tusks and rhino horns smuggled by
poachers from southern Africa and bound for illegal ivory markets in
Asia.

It was one of Africa’s biggest ivory hauls.

Sniffer dogs found the nearly 300kg of ivory at Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta
Airport in cargo crates coming from Mozambique on a Kenya Airways (KQNA.NR) flight, the director of Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) told reporters late on Tuesday.

“The rhino horns are freshly cut and one of them has a bullet wound,” Julius Kipng’etich said.

“It’s a sad moment. Remember all wildlife wherever it is, is a world
heritage. So if we lose any, it’s a loss to all of us as a human race.”

Kipng’etich said the animals must have been poached from southern
African countries like Tanzania, Zimbabwe or South Africa as Mozambique
had no rhinos and hardly any elephants.

According to the WWF
conservation group, the whole continent has about 18,000 rhinos left,
while sub-Saharan Africa has 690,000 elephants at most — where once
they were millions.

Ivory demand in Asia is stimulating poaching by international criminal rings, wildlife experts say.

“In the last year we have witnessed an upsurge in poaching for
trophies, especially elephants and rhinos,” Kipng’etich said. “In the
last year alone Zimbabwe lost 100 rhinos and South Africa 162. This to
me is the tip of the iceberg.”

Kipng’etich said the illegal shipment was bound for Laos, but that China was more likely to be the final destination.

“From our own experience of movement of wildlife trophies, definitely this was going to China,” he said.

Rhino horns are used in traditional Chinese medicine where many people believe it can cure arthritis and fever.

Elsewhere, ivory is in demand for carving into dagger-handles and other ornaments.

Kipng’etich said a kilo of rhino horn was worth $5,000 on the black
market, while a kilo of ivory sold for $3,000 a kilo, meaning the haul
in Kenya of 280kg of elephant ivory and 18kg of rhino horn worth almost
$1 million.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • TwitThis
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Pownce
  • MySpace

35,00 years old Mammoth Ivory Carved flutes

Wow.. this is really an amazing & interesting news about finding 35,000 years old  mammoth ivory Flutes  from Hohle Fels cavern in southwest Germany by the team from Tubingen University.

Bone flute from Hohle Fels (H Jensen)

The flutes are the oldest musical instruments found to date.

The cavern area  is already well known as a site for signs of early human efforts; in May, members of the same team unveiled a Hohle Fels find that could be the world’s oldest Venus figure(The archaeologists believe that she mad from mammoth ivory as well – Read about the old  carved ivory figurine)  .

The most well-preserved of the flutes is made from a vulture’s wing bone, measuring 20cm long with five finger holes and two “V”-shaped notches on one end of the instrument into which the researchers assume the player blew.

The archaeologists also found fragments of two other flutes carved from ivory that they believe was taken from the tusks of mammoths.

The find brings the total number of flutes discovered from this era to eight, four made from mammoth ivory and four made from bird bones.

Prehistorian historian Nicholas Conard presents the bone flute from Hohle Fels to journalists

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • TwitThis
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Pownce
  • MySpace

4 new carved Ivory tusks – WoW!!!

What an anazing four Mammoth Carved Ivory Tusks just added to our Carved Ivory gallery. This 4 Carved Ivory tusk  all made from the extinct woolly Mammoth Tusk – therefore they are ABSOLUTELY LEGAL FOR TRADE WORLDWIDE!!!

4 new Carved Ivory Tusks just added to our Gallery:

Prince Traveling – Ivory Tusk
Fukurokuju, Geisha & Crane – Ivory Tusk
Landscape Scene  – Caved Ivory Tusk
& Last one Elephants & Rhinoceros Tusk.

All tusks are hand carved by Master carver to perfection, pay attention on the ivory carving on each tusks.

The Tusks are signed by the Artist.

The price of the tusks are from 1,000$ – 2,400$

All tusks are available to purchase at www.IvoryAndArt.com web site.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • TwitThis
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Pownce
  • MySpace

Huge – Elephants tribe Carved Ivory Tusk

Fascinating Huge Carved ivory Tusk of Elephant tribe. This Huge Tusk is carved out from Mammoth ivory tusk that it’s absolutely Legal worldwide.

The unique tusk has benn hand carved by the master carver to perfection & its took him more than 1 year – in order to finish his work. each elephant is different from other tribe member.

You can actually Buy this amazing  Mammoth ivory tusk  at IvoryAndart.com

The Measurements of The Huge Elephant Tusk:
117 Cm – from edge to edge, size of carving only 180cm, Thickness: 8 cm
Height with wood stand: 163cm.


Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • TwitThis
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • Pownce
  • MySpace